All posts tagged food sharing

Chicken-Keeping Workshop and Pot Luck, Sat July 20 2013, 1-4 pm

Chicken-Keeping Workshop

A busy afternoon

 

Experience the joys of Backyard Chicken-keeping!

Come hang out @ the Little Blue House for a fun and interactive chicken-keeping teach-in! Meet the chickens, see the henhouse and chicken run. Learn how raising chickens and veggies can be complementary activities. Featuring guest speakers the Gardenerd & HoneyLove! We’ll wrap up the afternoon with a potluck feast.

CHICKEN-KEEPING WORKSHOP
& POTLUCK PARTY

Little Blue House—Culver City 90230
For specific address, RSVP
TransitionCulverCity@gmail.com
or text or call 310-780-1051
(please RSVP for a head count)

Workshop is free—
Donations are welcome (helps support future events).

Please bring a potluck dish for 8-10 people.

About Our Guest Presenters:

Christy WilhelmiChristy Wilhelmi will talk to us about chickens as gardening companions and the “workhorses” of a healthy garden ecosystem plus other kernals of wisdom from her new book Gardening for Geeks which she’ll have on hand for purchase. ” REVIEW: “Gardening for Geeks is written in easy to understand language that will be useful for both the beginner and advanced gardener. There are loads of photographs, drawings and charts to help you see exactly what the author is covering in each chapter. If you pick up one gardening book this season, this needs to be it.” – Confessions of an Overworked Mom

HoneyLove Urban Bee KeepingHoneyLove’s Chelsea McFarland will pop by to speak for the bees! A local nonprofit conservation organization, HoneyLove’s mission is to protect the honeybees and inspire and educate new urban beekeepers. Why urban beekeeping? HoneyLove believes that the city is the last refuge of the honeybee. Our home gardens are free of pesticides, and in cities like Los Angeles, there is year-round availability of pollen and nectar.

Residential Parkway Regulations to be Discussed at City Hall – TUESDAY May 28, 2013

Out with lawn grass strips, in with drought tolerant plantings and food gardens!

 

Parkway Regulations

 

Many Southern California cities are re-writing their residential parkway ordinances to be more in alignment with the environmental need for drought tolerance while creating a framework for aesthetics and ease of use. Now Culver City governance has Parkways on the agenda this coming TUESDAY, MAY 28, 2013 and you — yes you! — can be part of the conversation.

CULVER CITY PUBLIC MEETING TO DISCUSS
ADOPTION of a RESOLUTION ESTABLISHING
RESIDENTIAL PARKWAY STANDARDS
When:

TUESDAY, May 28th, 2013, 7pm

Where:
Culver City Council Chambers
9770 Culver Blvd., Culver City, 90232

From Culver City’s Official Public Notice of Meeting :

On Tuesday, May 28, 2013, the City Council is scheduled to consider the 1) Introduction of an ordinance related to the process for tree removals and the requirements for making modifications to parkways; and (2) Adoption of a resolution establishing Residential Parkway Standards. All members of the public are welcome to attend and participate in the discussion.

If you live locally and are reading this website, it is most likely you’ve already converted your parkway to something more environmentally friendly with an array of luxurious drought-happy plants and bushes. And perhaps you’re growing a patch of veggies there, or put a park bench and a winding path in your parkway to help build community in your neighborhood like City Repair has encouraged throughout Portland, Oregon. Or maybe you’ve even installed a Little Free Library to promote literacy & solidarity in your neighborhood! Well, it looks like all of this and more will be out-of-compliance and incurring permit fees and possible fines if the new regulations go through unchallenged.

SEE CULVER CITY’s new proposed ordinance here >>
(scroll to Agenda Item A-1)
NOTE: There’s also information on tree removal in the ordinance,
but the focus of this blogpost is on parkway landscaping.

Come deliver your 3 minutes of opinion in person to the council,
or if you can’t attend but wish to express your views,
write an email to the council
Please familiarize yourself with the actual 5/28 agenda item report
(just posted 5/22) so you’ll be up to date with the facts.

When you come to City Hall chambers, fill out a speaker’s card—ask for assistance if it’s your first time.

IN A NUTSHELL: The report drafted by staff is an amendment to a chapter of city municipal code pertinent to Parkway Planting Standards and Tree Removal Regulations & Ordinances. Exhibit C&D of the report includes a list of recommended plantings: 20 lawn alternatives (EXHIBIT C, no permit required) and 64 drought tolerant perennials & low bushes (EXHIBIT D, permit required)—nothing over 30 inches allowed. No edibles, no garden veggies, no fruit trees. And there’s hardscaping limitations too.  TO VIEW THE LIST of recommended plants which includes helpful color reference pictures, go to the 5/28/13 Agenda report, scroll to Item A-1, click on the underlined description, then click on the PDF of “Attachments” on the right, then scroll to “Exhibit D”… whew!

Too much work? Here’s some excerpts from the proposed ordinance:

§ 9.08.210—PLANTINGS, LANDSCAPING, HARDSCAPES OR OTHER ITEMS IN PARKWAYS: PERMIT REQUIRED

A.   No person shall plant any tree, plant, shrub, flower, vine, vegetable, grain, or other vegetation in or on any Parkway in the City without first obtaining a permit from the Public Works Director. Such permit shall state the variety, location and size of trees, plants and shrubs to be planted.

B.  No person shall install, construct, deposit, or maintain any stepping stones, pavers, brick, rock, concrete structure or any other item or obstacle in or on any Parkway within the City without first obtaining a permit from the Public Works Director. Such permit shall state the type and location of materials to be installed, constructed, deposited or maintained…

If we’ve read the report correctly, it says that, pending passage of this proposed ordinance and Standards, a processing application & inspection fee for a basic parkway permit (other than walkable plantings selected from the recommended list) of $151.50 will be enacted. We’re hoping for some clarification on this point.

Here’s more from the proposed Ordinance about code violations:

§ 9.08.230 — VIOLATIONS UNLAWFUL; PENALTIES; ADMINISTRATIVE COST RECOVERY

C.   A violation of any provision of this Subchapter is subject to a civil action brought by the City Attorney, punishable by a civil fine not less than one hundred dollars ($100) and not exceeding one thousand dollars ($1,000) per violation for each day, or part thereof, such violation occurs.
D.  A violation of any provision of this Subchapter may, at the discretion of the City Attorney, be prosecuted as an infraction or misdemeanor and subject to the criminal penalties provided in Sections 1.01.040 and 1.01.045 of this Code…
F.  It is the intent of the City Council to recover the costs incurred by the City from: (1) enforcing and obtaining compliance with the provisions of this Subchapter and (2) damage to City property resulting from violations of the Subchapter.

Continuing on to page 7, concerning EXISTING NON-CONFORMING PARKWAYS, the report says:

There are currently a significant number of unpermitted alterations to parkways that will be out-of-compliance with these proposed Residential Parkway Standards (and with the existing CCMC and Proposed Ordinance, if adopted, which require a permit). Code Enforcement has not been aggressively pursuing these violations due to the lack of clear Standards and a designated permit process. With the adoption of the proposed Residential Parkway Standards,  the Code Enforcement Division has indicated that it intends to prioritize enforcement based on complaints received and the severity of the violations, consistent with the current Council-approved approach.

And here’s some illustrations from Exhibit B of the Report’s Attachments:

CC Parkway Agenda ItemA1-Dos&Donts

 

Can Culver City create customized regulations to suit the needs of our residents? Can we plan ahead as an entire community to become more resilient and food-growing-friendly in the face of challenging times or have a conversation about appropriate use of public space for the public good? Come let Culver City governance know your opinion!

If you’d like to learn more about this issue from the Los Angeles perspective, here’s some interesting stories:

“Taking Back the Streets through Urban Agriculture” from ROOTS OF CHANGE >>

An opinion about the L.A. Parkway Planting Rules from our friends the urban D.I.Y. homestead folks at ROOT SIMPLE >>

SUCCESSFUL CHALLENGE of L.A. MUNICIPAL CODE  § 56.08: Support Growing Edibles on the Parkway in L.A. >>

The inspirational story of LA’s Urban Garden Guerrilla Ron Finley on TED TALKS, Long Beach, Feb 2013:

(over a million views!)

If embedded video not visible above, click here to view:
 http://on.ted.com/Finley

Hope to see you at City Hall on Tuesday, May 28th!

——————-
POST-MEETING ADDENDUM:

Read about how the vote went  >>>
(spoiler alert: happy beginning, much more story to unfold!)

Upcoming Baking 101 Workshop: Homemade Sourdough Starter

2nd in a series of TCC baking workshops at “the little blue house”!

Sour Dough Bread

ummm-ummmm good! Transition RE-SKILLING never tasted so delicious!


BAKING 101: HOMEMADE SOURDOUGH STARTER
RE-SKILLING WORKSHOP 

Sunday, February 17, 2013
1 pm – 4:30 pm
at “The Little Blue House”
(RSVP for location)

This time, we’ll be sharing the basics of bread baking from yeast to feast ! We’ll have all the bread-baking phases ready to demo this afternoon so attendees can experience the entire process of making sourdough loaves from scratch. We’ll finish up with bread tasting & community tea. Bring an apron if you have one. This event great for beginners! 

Each attendee will receive a portion of sourdough starter to take home.

$10 materials fee.

RSVP for Address:  email TCC.

Check out the report of our previous Baking 101 event >>

And then there were hand pies! TCC Event Report

Baking 101: Hand Pies!

 

Our Baking 101 workshop at Michelle’s house was a tasty success!

In true Transition style, our goal was to help re-skill people about baking to encourage more kitchen confidence. And in true experiential learning style (Michelle’s background), the afternoon was hand’s-on and exploratory instead of lecture and demonstration so we all dove in to the process.  Some participants shared some baking wisdom and techniques while others had their first try at a rolling pin or an “egg wash” glaze.

Flour from a Coffee Grinder

Pulsing the Food Processor

Wheatberries in the Grain Mill

Hand Cranked Grain Mill

Primitive Mortar & Pestle

THE FLOUR EXPERIMENT: First, we found out that flour doesn’t necessarily have to come in a bag from the store! But can we make flour without the help of electricity? (YES!) Does pie dough HAVE to be made from wheat, or what else works?  We experimented with making almond flour with a mortar & pestle (actually a Mexican Molcajete made from volcanic rock), a coffee grinder, and a food processor. Many of us took turns hand-cranking  the Country Living Hand Grain Mill,  turning wheatberries and whole grain rice into fine soft  flours. We also had back-up bags of both wheat & gluten-free flours, including sorghum flour to test different blends for our hand pies.

Next, we mixed & rolled out our various doughs and prepared our apple fillings. Here’s the crew in various phases of production.

Filling the hand pies

Shaping the hand pies

Apple Slicing Crew

Rolling Dough

 

     

THE RESULTS: We all learned that basic baking is simple and easy. And also that experimenting is highly recommended! The almond flours were a bit too crumbly for crusts so will require further testing (but will make a great ice cream topping for now!). Some of us added a dab of Marion’s homemade Jalapeno Pepper Relish to the fillings for a tasty kick.

We wrapped up the day with tea and hand pie tasting. There were even a few samples that made it home to loved ones.

All in all, a great afternoon of learning basic kitchen skills, building friendships & community, and celebrating the bounties of life!

 

“Fixing the Future” — A Special Theatrical Event July 18, 2012

FixTheFuture Documentary & Panel

 

SEE THE FILM TRAILER >>

TCC joins with the non-profit L.A. organization Living Economy Salon to announce this unique Documentary and onscreen Panel Discussion coming to the Pacific Culver Stadium Theatres on Wednesday, July 18th, 2012—part of a nationwide screening in atleast 50 theatres in cities across the United States.

According to the Transition U.S. website, this is an unprecedented opportunity to be a part of a national effort to support local economic initiatives. Due to a wildly successful PBS version, the filmmakers have made a new feature-length version of the documentary & accompanying pre-taped panel discussion that you can be among the first to see.

FIXING THE FUTURE
Documentary & On-Screen Panel Discussion
Wednesday, July 18th, 2012
7:30 -10:00 pm
Culver Pacific Stadium 12 Theatres
9500 Culver Boulevard, Culver City, CA 90232
(Tickets will be sold at the box office, or available in advance thru MovieTickets.com

ABOUT THE FILM: In Fixing the Future, host David Brancaccio of public radio’s Marketplace and NOW on PBS visits people and organizations across America that are attempting a revolution: the reinvention of the American economy. By featuring communities using sustainable and innovative approaches to create jobs and build prosperity, Fixing the Future inspires hope and renewal in a people overwhelmed by economic collapse.

The film highlights effective, local practices such as: local business alliances, community banking, time banking/hour exchange, worker cooperatives and local currencies.

Following the documentary audiences will enjoy an exclusive onscreen discussion panel featuring luminaries:

• Bill McKibben, author, educator and environmentalist, creator of 350.org, a global grassroots movement to solve the climate crisis

Majora Carter, urban renewal eco-activist whose motto is “green the ghetto!”

Mike Brady, owner of the successful gourmet Greyston Bakery , a leading model for social enterprise and community economic renewal

• David Brancaccio, reporter, anchor and storyteller.

Attendees will also be introduced to our community’s local time banking endeavor, Our Time Bank. Founded in 2009, OTB is a member-led group of community members in Culver City, Palms and Mar Vista who use an internet-based indirect bartering system to promote a Sharing Economy.

About Transition U.S. >>

Living Economy Salon‘s mission is to foster a dialogue and connect people around new innovations in economic models that promise a more fair and abundant economy for all. They put on other fun & informative events . Check them out >>

 

100 Mile Community Meal

100 Mile Meal

Our Transition neighbors in Mar Vista/Venice are hosting this wonderful community event in honor of the Mayor’s Day of Service to celebrate together while raising awareness around food localization.

100-MILE MEALCommunity Potluck
March 31, 2012
12:30 pm – 2:30 pm
The Learning Garden @ Venice High 

Did you know? The average American meal travels 1,500 miles from the farm to your table? Not only does local produce taste better, it’s better for you too! and it saves wear-and-tear on the planet. Positive initiatives to localize our communiy food resources are happening right now on the westside. Come find out what’s going on while sharing a feast with friends old and new.

The 100-Mile Meal gives us the opportunity to stop and ask where each ingredient that we take for granted comes from. We will gather in the beautiful Venice Learning Garden to share our recipes and resources to build a new world, one meal at a time. Think Global. Buy Local!

Your Challenge: Prepare a dish with the intent of using all or most  of the ingredients grown from within 100 miles of your home. Homegrown counts double! See how much you can minimize the carbon footprint of your potluck offering, and be ready to share the tale! —Include a label detailing the source of your ingredients and the recipe.

Note: 100-mile radius spans from Bakersfield to San Diego.

What to Bring

• potluck item to serve 8 (main dish, side dish, vegetable, salad, bread, drink, or dessert)
• comprehensive label detailing the source of your ingredients
• a copy of your recipe to share
• your own dishes and cutlery (encouraged)
• reusable water bottle
• sunscreen

Getting There
The Learning Garden at Venice High School is located at Venice Blvd and Walgrove Ave. Enter the garden from Walgrove, through the chain link gate located between Venice and Zanja.

Please consider walking, biking, taking the 33 or 733 Metro bus on Venice Boulevard, or carpooling to the event. (If you do bring a car, there is street parking on Walgrove and Zanja).

L E A R N  •  S H A R E  •  C O N N E C T



 

Westside Produce Exchange Saturday Dec. 10

Photos from the exchange courtesy of Gillian Ferguson.

The Westside Produce Exchange is a group of people who share the abundance from their gardens and kitchens with each other monthly. The core purpose of the produce exchange is to reduce food waste and ensure that the bounty of our yards can provide sustenance for others.

Here’s what you do if you’d like to participate.  First – and above all else – SEND AN EMAIL to westsideproduce@gmail.com with:
what produce you’ll have to contribute this Saturday
whether you’d like to volunteer to bag or deliver
whether you will be picking up your bag or need delivery
include your address and phone number so I can figure out delivery schedules

To include you in this Saturday’s exchange, Naomi will need to hear back from you by this THURSDAY (December 8th) at NOON.
Once she knows who’s in, she’ll send out a final details email to all responding participants by Friday, including confirmations for those of you wishing to bag or deliver.

Participants will drop off their bags of produce at The Venice Learning Garden the morning of December 10th between 9 am – NOON.

The Learning Garden is located at Walgrove Ave & Venice Blvd. Enter from Walgrove through the chain link gate, between Venice and Zanja.

Bagging volunteers will be needed to count everything and redistribute it at NOON, and delivery volunteers will be needed to deliver at 2:00. Each driver will only have 2 deliveries to make, all nearby, and I will try to pair drivers with drop-off close to their homes.

WHAT TO EXCHANGE:
1. Fresh organic produce: fruits, vegetables, or edible herbs. We will NOT be taking non-edible herbs such as burning sage, many people do not know what to do with non-edibles, and they can be confusing and problematic. This is about free TASTY produce!
2. Fresh beautiful vase-ready flowers (no weeds, fillers, or quick-wilters, please!)
3. Fresh baked goods, preserves, or other individual prepared food items. Not everyone has fresh produce all year round, and we are happy to receive the bounty of your kitchen as well. However, if you go this route, you MUST pre-package each item individually for easy and clean distribution. No sheet trays of brownies or sacks of cookies.

Each bag of produce dropped off should be labeled with the participant’s name, phone number, and address.

Contact westsideproduce@gmail.com to participate and/or to get on the mailing list for this fabulous monthly exchange! Also read an article about the exchange in the Whole Life Times blog here.

News from the Westside Produce Exchange

The Westside Produce Exchange is a group of people who share the abundance from their gardens and kitchens with each other monthly. The core purpose of the produce exchange is to reduce food waste and ensure that the bounty of our yards can provide sustenance for others.

From Naomi – Westside Produce Exchange organizer

On Saturday, we had a beautiful, bountiful exchange, followed by a delicious potluck lunch in the Learning Garden. We had Oranges, Lemons, Meyer Lemons, Peaches, Cucumbers, Bush Beans, Celery, Fennel, Chard, Kale, Romaine, Sorrel, Eggs, Potatoes, Beets, Onions, Rosemary, Thyme, Cilantro, Sage, Mint, Stevia, Dried Herb Packets, Herbed Focaccia, Mini Bundt Cakes, and Pumpkin Chocolate Chip Cookies! Wow! If I forgot something, I apologize, there was just SO much gorgeous produce and homemade treats this month.

The potluck was so much fun, I am already thinking about having a harvest potluck this fall. We shared lovely homemade local dishes, Farmer’s market tales, and gardening tips. Can’t wait for the next one!

Contact Naomi Curland westsideproduce@gmail.com to sign up – read an article about the Westside Produce Exchange in the Venice Beachhead to learn more.

Photos from the exchange courtesy of Gillian Ferguson.