Category: Environment

Free Eco Movie: Ecological Consciousness, Sat Aug 10, 2013 — 7 pm

AndrewFaust-EcologicalConsciousness

There are billions of years of collected wisdom in the fabric of our being.
How do we unlock our inner cosmic energy in the landscape?

TCC & our neighbors Transition Mar Vista/Venice are co-hosting an inspiring video from one of NYC’s leading permaculturists, Andrew Faust of the Center for Bioregional Living . Join us in exploring what it means to begin to live in ways that intentionally participates with evolution.

ECO-MOVIE NIGHT:
ECOLOGICAL CONSCIOUSNESS

Saturday, August 10, 7-9pm
Sivananda Yoga Vedanta Center, 13325 Beach Ave Marina del Rey 90292

FREE event—donations always welcome.

Discussion follows film

 

Andrew Faust

ABOUT ANDREW: One of North America’s premier Permaculture teachers and designers with nearly two decades of experience in the field, Andrew Faust’s passionate and visionary presentation and curriculum has been inspiring and motivating students since his days as an alternative school teacher at Upattinas in Glenmoore, Pennsylvania. Andrew lived off the grid in West Virginia for 8 years where he designed and built a Permaculture inspired homestead including a 1600 sq ft strawbale house. He moved to Brooklyn in 2007 and has been applying his knowledge to the urban landscape, culminating in a Permaculture Design Certification course many consider to be life changing.

Andrew is founder of The Center for Bioregional Living in Ellenville, NY with his partner Adriana Magana. The Center is a pilot campus for his students and clients to learn how to create diverse regional Infrastructures that are well adapted to LOCAL ecological, social and geological realities.  Being experienced in both rural & urban permaculture, Andrew’s curriculum teaches how to retrofit urban environments to be more ecologically sound and socially responsible as well as how to create positive relationships between cities and outlying rural communities.

 

The Parkway Landscaping Report: YES, the Public WILL be Heard!

Drought Tolerant Parkway Curb

 

Will Culver City residents be allowed to put veggies on the parkways abutting their homes?

Can property owners place benches and community library boxes on the parkways without getting fined? 

In these economically challenging times, would a permit fee of $151.50 for installing drought tolerant perennials and succulents in one’s parkway promote or prevent people from removing their thirsty lawn strips? 

How can our city ordinances support best-use of abundant residential parkway public land?

Continue reading

Residential Parkway Regulations to be Discussed at City Hall – TUESDAY May 28, 2013

Out with lawn grass strips, in with drought tolerant plantings and food gardens!

 

Parkway Regulations

 

Many Southern California cities are re-writing their residential parkway ordinances to be more in alignment with the environmental need for drought tolerance while creating a framework for aesthetics and ease of use. Now Culver City governance has Parkways on the agenda this coming TUESDAY, MAY 28, 2013 and you — yes you! — can be part of the conversation.

CULVER CITY PUBLIC MEETING TO DISCUSS
ADOPTION of a RESOLUTION ESTABLISHING
RESIDENTIAL PARKWAY STANDARDS
When:

TUESDAY, May 28th, 2013, 7pm

Where:
Culver City Council Chambers
9770 Culver Blvd., Culver City, 90232

From Culver City’s Official Public Notice of Meeting :

On Tuesday, May 28, 2013, the City Council is scheduled to consider the 1) Introduction of an ordinance related to the process for tree removals and the requirements for making modifications to parkways; and (2) Adoption of a resolution establishing Residential Parkway Standards. All members of the public are welcome to attend and participate in the discussion.

If you live locally and are reading this website, it is most likely you’ve already converted your parkway to something more environmentally friendly with an array of luxurious drought-happy plants and bushes. And perhaps you’re growing a patch of veggies there, or put a park bench and a winding path in your parkway to help build community in your neighborhood like City Repair has encouraged throughout Portland, Oregon. Or maybe you’ve even installed a Little Free Library to promote literacy & solidarity in your neighborhood! Well, it looks like all of this and more will be out-of-compliance and incurring permit fees and possible fines if the new regulations go through unchallenged.

SEE CULVER CITY’s new proposed ordinance here >>
(scroll to Agenda Item A-1)
NOTE: There’s also information on tree removal in the ordinance,
but the focus of this blogpost is on parkway landscaping.

Come deliver your 3 minutes of opinion in person to the council,
or if you can’t attend but wish to express your views,
write an email to the council
Please familiarize yourself with the actual 5/28 agenda item report
(just posted 5/22) so you’ll be up to date with the facts.

When you come to City Hall chambers, fill out a speaker’s card—ask for assistance if it’s your first time.

IN A NUTSHELL: The report drafted by staff is an amendment to a chapter of city municipal code pertinent to Parkway Planting Standards and Tree Removal Regulations & Ordinances. Exhibit C&D of the report includes a list of recommended plantings: 20 lawn alternatives (EXHIBIT C, no permit required) and 64 drought tolerant perennials & low bushes (EXHIBIT D, permit required)—nothing over 30 inches allowed. No edibles, no garden veggies, no fruit trees. And there’s hardscaping limitations too.  TO VIEW THE LIST of recommended plants which includes helpful color reference pictures, go to the 5/28/13 Agenda report, scroll to Item A-1, click on the underlined description, then click on the PDF of “Attachments” on the right, then scroll to “Exhibit D”… whew!

Too much work? Here’s some excerpts from the proposed ordinance:

§ 9.08.210—PLANTINGS, LANDSCAPING, HARDSCAPES OR OTHER ITEMS IN PARKWAYS: PERMIT REQUIRED

A.   No person shall plant any tree, plant, shrub, flower, vine, vegetable, grain, or other vegetation in or on any Parkway in the City without first obtaining a permit from the Public Works Director. Such permit shall state the variety, location and size of trees, plants and shrubs to be planted.

B.  No person shall install, construct, deposit, or maintain any stepping stones, pavers, brick, rock, concrete structure or any other item or obstacle in or on any Parkway within the City without first obtaining a permit from the Public Works Director. Such permit shall state the type and location of materials to be installed, constructed, deposited or maintained…

If we’ve read the report correctly, it says that, pending passage of this proposed ordinance and Standards, a processing application & inspection fee for a basic parkway permit (other than walkable plantings selected from the recommended list) of $151.50 will be enacted. We’re hoping for some clarification on this point.

Here’s more from the proposed Ordinance about code violations:

§ 9.08.230 — VIOLATIONS UNLAWFUL; PENALTIES; ADMINISTRATIVE COST RECOVERY

C.   A violation of any provision of this Subchapter is subject to a civil action brought by the City Attorney, punishable by a civil fine not less than one hundred dollars ($100) and not exceeding one thousand dollars ($1,000) per violation for each day, or part thereof, such violation occurs.
D.  A violation of any provision of this Subchapter may, at the discretion of the City Attorney, be prosecuted as an infraction or misdemeanor and subject to the criminal penalties provided in Sections 1.01.040 and 1.01.045 of this Code…
F.  It is the intent of the City Council to recover the costs incurred by the City from: (1) enforcing and obtaining compliance with the provisions of this Subchapter and (2) damage to City property resulting from violations of the Subchapter.

Continuing on to page 7, concerning EXISTING NON-CONFORMING PARKWAYS, the report says:

There are currently a significant number of unpermitted alterations to parkways that will be out-of-compliance with these proposed Residential Parkway Standards (and with the existing CCMC and Proposed Ordinance, if adopted, which require a permit). Code Enforcement has not been aggressively pursuing these violations due to the lack of clear Standards and a designated permit process. With the adoption of the proposed Residential Parkway Standards,  the Code Enforcement Division has indicated that it intends to prioritize enforcement based on complaints received and the severity of the violations, consistent with the current Council-approved approach.

And here’s some illustrations from Exhibit B of the Report’s Attachments:

CC Parkway Agenda ItemA1-Dos&Donts

 

Can Culver City create customized regulations to suit the needs of our residents? Can we plan ahead as an entire community to become more resilient and food-growing-friendly in the face of challenging times or have a conversation about appropriate use of public space for the public good? Come let Culver City governance know your opinion!

If you’d like to learn more about this issue from the Los Angeles perspective, here’s some interesting stories:

“Taking Back the Streets through Urban Agriculture” from ROOTS OF CHANGE >>

An opinion about the L.A. Parkway Planting Rules from our friends the urban D.I.Y. homestead folks at ROOT SIMPLE >>

SUCCESSFUL CHALLENGE of L.A. MUNICIPAL CODE  § 56.08: Support Growing Edibles on the Parkway in L.A. >>

The inspirational story of LA’s Urban Garden Guerrilla Ron Finley on TED TALKS, Long Beach, Feb 2013:

(over a million views!)

If embedded video not visible above, click here to view:
 http://on.ted.com/Finley

Hope to see you at City Hall on Tuesday, May 28th!

——————-
POST-MEETING ADDENDUM:

Read about how the vote went  >>>
(spoiler alert: happy beginning, much more story to unfold!)

Plastic Bag Ordinance being presented to City Council Monday, May 13, 2013

City of Culver City
City Council Agenda Item:

Introduction of
Single-Use Carryout Bag Ordinance
and Adoption of
California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) Determination

 

The proposed ordinance proposes to ban the issuance of plastic single-use carryout bags (excluding product and produce bags) and requires that covered stores impose a minimum 10 cent charge on each recyclable paper carryout bag. These charges are retained by the stores. Low income customers participating in either the Special Supplemental Food Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) or in the CalFresh/Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) are exempted from these charges.

The proposed ordinance covers the following types of stores (approx. 72 retailers in Culver City are anticipated to meet these criteria):

1. A full-line, self-service retail store with gross annual sales of two million dollars ($2,000,000), or more, that sells a line of dry grocery, canned goods, or non-food items and some perishable items; or,

2. A store of at least 10,000 square feet of retail space that generates sales or use tax and that has a pharmacy; or

3. A drug store, pharmacy, supermarket, grocery store, convenience food store, food mart, or other entity engaged in the retail sale of a limited line of goods that includes milk, bread, soda, and snack foods, including those stores with a license issued by the Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control.

In order to allow sufficient time for businesses to use up their existing inventory of bags and to adjust to the requirements of the proposed ordinance, its implementation is proposed to be phased in. Larger stores will be given six months from the effective date of the proposed ordinance (approximately 210 days after the date of adoption of the proposed ordinance by the City Council) to comply, whereas smaller stores will be given twelve months from the effective date of the proposed ordinance (approximately 395 days after the date of adoption of the proposed ordinance by the City Council).

The proposed ordinance is very similar to the Los Angeles County Ordinance. The minor modifications that are proposed include:

1) Requiring retailers to post signage clearly indicating the per bag charge for recyclable paper carryout bags so customers are not surprised by the charges.

2) Replacing the quarterly reporting requirement with a requirement that stores keep records and make them available to the City upon request. This should reduce the reporting burden on stores and staff time required for oversight.

3) Specifying a minimum charge of 10 cents rather than a charge of exactly 10 cents. This will allow stores flexibility to charge more than 10 cents for each recyclable paper bag, recognizing that some stores may pay more than 10 cents for the bags they provide to customers.

4) Enabling the minimum 10 cent charge to be increased by resolution. This change will make it easier for the City Council to raise the charge if it elects to do so at a future date (for example, if the minimum 10 cent charge is no longer effective at achieving the desired reductions in bag use due to inflation or other factors).

5) Changing the effective date of the proposed ordinance and the account for depositing fines.

 

The notifcation sent out to residents:

Announcement of Ordinance

Transportation How To Fieldtrip… let’s take bikes on the train!

bike-train fieldtrip to downtown LA

Bike/Train Field Trip to Downtown Los Angeles

WHEN: Saturday, June 1, 2013  9 am – 3 pm

WHERE:  Meet-up at  Culver City Hall 

9770 Culver Blvd.  Culver City  90230

Come spend an exciting day touring downtown LA with the friendly alternative transportation commuters of TCC and CC Bike Coalition who will teach you the ins & outs of bike-train travel.

Learn how to take your bike on the train with the group or join us sans bike—since we won’t be riding very far, this trip is suitable for walkers and bicyclists.

Things to bring:

• Water
• Picnic lunch
• Bike helmet (if on bike)
• Bike lock (if on bike)
• Metro pass or money to purchase a pass ($5 for all day pass)

Meghan Bike ChauffeurWe’ll rendezvous at Culver City City Hall plaza to receive some basic bike safety instruction from Meghan Sahli-Wells, one of the founders of Culver City Bicycle Coalition and now Vice Mayor of Culver City. Some points covered will be where to ride, the importance of “being predictable” on your bike, how to make safe turns and how to let drivers know your intentions.

Then we’ll board the Expo Line train at the downtown Culver City station, go to the end of the line and change trains at the 7th Street Station to get to the L.A. Civic Center Station. Then we’ll pedal and/or walk to the new Grand Park for our al fresco picnic lunch.  We’ll have a chance to try out the famous lime green bike lanes of Spring Street adjacent to the park and explore the public sculpture art of the park.

The Last Bookstore in Downtown LA

THE LAST BOOKSTORE‘s upstairs Labyrinth: a porthole into an alternate universe. (Photo courtesy of Genaro Molina/Los Angeles Times / February 28, 2013 )

One more stop before we catch the train home: The Last Book Store, a former bank building that’s been converted into a fascinating bookstore/art gallery/performance space. In addition to being an amazing placed to buy used books for a great price, the Last Book Store also hosts special events and has become a communal canvas for local artists. There are many nooks and hidden passageways to discover (including an authentic bank vault). You might want to bring some cash for the labyrinthine $1-per-book room!

Then we’ll board the train for the return trip to Culver City.

 

See You at City Council Chambers Monday May 13 – Support the Plastic Bag Ban!

Support the Plastic Bag Ban in Culver City

bag monster

WHEN:  Monday, May 13th, 2013, 7 pm

WHERE:  Culver City Hall , Council Chambers 9770 Culver Blvd.  Culver City  90230

Let your voice be heard with our local governance!
This coming Monday night May 13th, staff will introduce the proposed Plastic Bag Ordinance to the Culver City Council to discuss and vote on. (READ THE ORDINANCE DETAILS HERE)

Overview:
1) Introduction of an Ordinance banning single-use plastic carryout bags and requiring a minimum $0.10 per bag charge for single-use paper carryout bags; and 2) Adoption of Resolutions adopting an Addendum to the Los Angeles County Final Environmental Impact Report (FEIR), Mitigation Monitoring Program, and Statement of Overriding Considerations in accordance with the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA).

If you live, work, play or shop in Culver City, please help us communicate the importance of reducing plastic bag use in our city by delivering your 3 minutes in person to the council, or by writing an email to the council to be read aloud in the chambers. When you come to City Hall chambers, fill out a speaker’s card—ask for assistance if its your first time.

THE PROPOSED PLASTIC BAG ORDINANCE >>

Read the article FIRST VOTE ON PLASTIC BAG ORDINANCE TO HAPPEN ON MAY 13

by Gary Walker in the 05/09/13 Culver City News >>

Here are some helpful talking points
From Heal the Bay >>

From Surfrider >>

Culver City Hall decorated with Plastic Bags What our community had to say about this issue back in 2010 >>


TCC’s Plastic Bag Think Tank Video >>
Council member Meghan Sahli-Wells’ Plastic Bag Report on 350.org >>
http://www.350.org/en/node/26349

Where do many of those bags end up? Swirling around in one of the FIVE GYRES! >>

Get Ready for MISINFORMATION TACTICS from the Plastic Bag Industry >>
http://5gyres.org/posts/2012/01/03/a_convenient_misconception_industry_tactics_for_misinformation 

In Defense of Plastic Bag Bans (on GreenBiz blog) >>
http://www.greenbiz.com/blog/2011/12/28/defense-plastic-bag-bans 

Plastic Bag Ban Article in Rolling Stone “PLASTIC BAG WARS” article in Rolling Stone >>
http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/news/the-plastic-bag-wars-20110725

 

Trashed Film with Jeremy IronsDon’t think there’s a problem? THINK AGAIN. 
TCC recently co-hosted a screening of a riveting documentary called TRASHED starring Jeremy Irons as the beleaguered narrator traveling around the world seeing how humanity has been dealing with its refuse. ONE OF THE BIG OFFENDERS is the seemingly innocuous single use plastic grocery bag… because plastic never really ever goes “away.” When it breaks down, the miniscule pieces of bag are mistaken for plankton and consumed by the bottom of the food chain, which then is consumed on up the food chain until it reaches us! Watch Jeremy age before your very eyes as the facts & stats unfold:  TRAILER >>

We have a chance to make a difference here in Culver City if we can convince our council members that banning single use plastic bags by larger grocery store chains is a change mandated by the people. Will you stand up and speak out next Monday?

Transition Guest Booth at 2013 Mar Vista Green Garden Showcase

11375 Matteson Ave. — Showcase Garden #5F — Transition Town Guest Booth

Saturday, April 20, 2013
10 am – 4 pm
SELF-GUIDED TOUR of 100 RESIDENTIAL GARDENS
Throughout our Community!

Tour Maps available at:
Showcase Central — House #4H >>
-or-
Transition Town Guest Booth — House #5F >>
11375 Matteson Avenue, L.A. 90066 

This annual Earth Day event in Mar Vista offers self-guided tours of 100 home gardens that exemplify environmentally friendly alternatives to the classic lawn. These local homeowners, renters, schools and churches have all taken the leap and converted their thirsty green expanses into drought-tolerant landscapes and edible gardens. The tour covers the spectrum from homespun do-it-yourself projects to professionally landscaped environments—including urban farms, sleek architectural hardscapes, composting & vermiculture, rain harvesting, aquaponics, chicken coops, sculpture gardens, hummingbird gardens… you name it! This year’s tour places special emphasis on the critical need for ocean friendly gardens and California native gardens that support much needed pollinators such as honey bees and monarch butterflies. It’s a great day to gather ideas and inspiration for your own future lawn conversion!

The International TRANSITION TOWNS movement will be represented at the special guest booth at house #5F, 11375 Matteson Ave., Los Angeles CA 90066It’s a collaboration between two local chapters: TCC (of course) and our neighbors, Transition Mar Vista/Venice. So if you’re not in a hurry to see the other 99 showcase gardens, there’s plenty of al fresco patio areas here to sit down, pour a lemonade, and hang out to chat with like-minded people about community resilience, food security solutions, permaculture, alternative building, water harvesting, food forests, and much more.

Learn about Transition Mar Vista/Venice’s pay-it-forward Good Karma Gardens work parties—they’re a great way to get started if you want to learn how to grow your own food! And if you need even more motivation to drop by, come by to meet seedling master Matt Van Diepen (of Mar Vista Farmers’ Market fame!) who will be on hand with FREE veggie seedling giveaways and advice on how to include more home-grown edibles in your life.  Owner of Home Grown Gardens L.A., Matt is one of GKG’s skilled project coordinators.

This year, House #5F features dwarf fruit trees and berry bushes, a brilliant display of spring wildflowers, stealth veggies interspersed with drought tolerant natives, meandering flagstone pathways and do-it-yourself bistro-style hardscaping all done under strict budgetary parameters—everything cheap, recycled, scavenged and free!  For helpful Do-It-Yourself tips, read the event report and access the resource links from last year’s Showcase workshop D.I.Y.: Yes You Can!: Creative Lawn Conversions on a Budget.

Rainwater Capture

RAINWATER CAPTURE
(SEE VIDEO!)

Another feature at this location is an unusual “hybrid” active and passive urban rainwater harvesting system.  Last winter the homeowners hosted a barn-raising-style Work Party to install the system. (SEE VIDEO HERE!) The volunteer crew, wrangled by Transition-friendly landscape architect John Tikotsky, created a passive diversion “reservoir” to help recharge the aquifer, helped install unique vertical tanks (an alternative to conventional rain barrels) for active catchment, and positioned a subsurface diverter pipe to feed the percolation area. The reservoir berms were planted with California native currants (ribes family) and shade happy leafy greens as the beginnings of an edible food forest understory. All this, in one day—a true demonstration of the power of community!

PEDAL-POWER! FREE BICYCLE PARKING
In efforts to support our community’s shift to a fossil-free future, TCC and our friends at the Culver City Bicycle Coalition are co-hosting a “pop-up” bike corral at House # 5F. Celebrate Earth Day in style: Visitors are invited to lower their carbon footprint by cruising the garden tour by bike!

Showcase maps are available at the Transition Guest Booth or Showcase Central at House #4F at 3635 Grandview Blvd.

2012 Showcase Bike Corral

FRACKING: The LA Story — Sat March 23, 9:30 am – 1 pm

Transition Culver City is combining forces with other local democracy & environmental activists and West Los Angeles College to present an action-oriented seminar about fracking and the democratic process.

WHEN:
Saturday, March 23, 2013
Registration:  9:30 am
Seminar: 10:00 am – 1:00 pm

WHERE:
West Los Angeles College
9000 Overland Ave., Culver City 90230

Fine Arts Auditorium (FA 100)

PARKING:
FREE parking—South Parking Structure only

Enter on Albert Vera Drive [map]

SEMINAR COST:
FREE—Includes Coffee

Seeking ways to squeeze a yield from depleted oil fields, producers of natural gas and oil across the nation are using a controversial extraction method called hydraulic fracturing (aka “FRACKING”) which forces a mixture of water and various chemicals underground under very high pressure to access hidden pockets of oil and gas. Despite sketchy regulations, ambiguous safety reports and public outrage, corporate interests continue to drive the current fracking and drilling boom.

What does this have to do with Southern California?

The Inglewood Oil Fields which hunker on the hills above WLA College is the largest contiguous urban oil field in America and is bi-sected by the active Newport-Inglewood fault line. Despite protests from concerned citizens about various health and safety issues—from air quality & noise pollution to cracks in their foundations—the 2012 Baldwin Hills Fracking Study reveals that the field has already been fracked, and that the sentous shale deep underground is a good candidate for more of the same unless the people unite to find their voice. The LA Times ran this article about the study >>

Come learn about your community rights and how to successfully mobilize.

 

  • Fracking & Democratic Process: Risks, Costs, Benefits
  • • Learn about local oil/gas extraction and fracking (hydraulic fracturing) and who benefits.
  • • Understand the health impacts and risks associated with fracking: are you at risk or paying the costs?
  • • Understand your options and how to ­exercise your democratic muscle…use it or lose it! How to take effective action on important issues.
  • • Create an action plan: sign up for direct action that will make a difference

 

Speakers & Agenda:

9:30 am — Coffee & Registration

10:00 am — Introductory Remarks
President Abu-Ghazaleh, plus WLAC ­faculty and student body representatives

10:15 am
The History and Terminology of Hydraulic Fracturing
C. Tom Williams, Ph.D., oil field specialist, Sierra Club CalFrac representative

10:30 am
— 
Urban Hazards of Oil Production in the L.A. Basin
Paul Ferrazzi, Executive Director, Citizens Coalition for a Safe Community

10:45 am
California: Don’t Be Pennsylvania!
Lance Simmens, Former Special Assistant for Intergovernmental Affairs to Ed Rendell, ­Former Governor of Pennsylvania

(Q&A follows) 

11:15 am
The Health Hazards of Fracking Chemicals
James Dahlgren, M.D., Envirotoxocology and Internal Medicine, UCLA Dept of ­Medicine
(Q&A follows) 

11:45 am
Culver City: Fracking City
Culver City Council Member Meghan ­Sahili-Wells

NOON
Proposal for a Ballot Initiative and Charter Amendment
Culver City Mayor Emeritus Gary Silbiger

12:15 pm — Q & A, Legislative Options
Stephen Murray, Baldwin Hills Oil Watch

12:30 pm — Closing Remarks
Prof. Olga Shewfelt, WLAC Professor of ­International Relations

12:45 pm — Adjourn for Action Planning ­Information


Transition Culver City teams up with Citizens Coalition for a Safe Community, Baldwin Hills Oil Watch, Make Culver City Safe, and our hosts at WLA College and their Work Environment Committee for this important awareness-raising forum and opportunity to learn about the democratic process.

 

Here’s the schedule with speakers all in one place:

WLAC Fracking Seminar Schedule, Speakers & Resources

 


Eco-Film: TRASHED, Sat. Mar 9, 7 pm @ reDiscover Center

“This film is a wake-up call about global waste.”
—Cannes Film Festival

This month’s eco-movie is the groundbreaking docu-feature Trashed starring Jeremy Irons who goes on a journey of discovery, disbelief, and hope as he witnesses the extent and effects of the global waste problem around the world and seeks out solutions. We buy it, we bury it, we burn it and then we ignore it. What happens to all the trash we produce? Each year, we now throw away fifty-eight billion disposable cups, billions of plastic bags, 200 billion litres of water bottles, billions of tons of household waste, toxic waste, and e-waste. But there are people and movements making a difference.

This meticulous, brave investigative film takes the viewer on a ride with Irons from skepticism to sorrow and from horror to hope. Official film website & trailer: www.trashedfilm.com Music by Vangelis.

We’re co-hosting this event with our neighbors Transition Mar Vista/Venice at   The reDiscover Center.What better place to screen a movie about trash than our local community art center/re-use warehouse/event space? An excerpt of their mission statement:

reDiscover promotes resource conservation, creativity, and community engagement through material reuse. Our Vision is for all Angelenos to have an outlet for acquiring and donating reusable material. As reDiscover meets this need, we move closer to a community where all waste materials can be rediscovered for their educational and creative value.

reDiscover is a nexus for environmental sustainability and crea using recycled materials. We achieve our mission and vision through strategic initiatives at our center with the reuse warehouse, gallery and event space, at schools and in the community. More about reDISCOVER >>

EVENT DATE: Saturday, March 9, 7:00pm
Doors open at 6:30 pm for networking and snacks.  Join in a brainstorming session after the screening!

VENUE: reDiscover Center, 12958 W. Washington Blvd., Los Angeles 90066   MAP >> 

FREE admission, donations welcome.

RSVP: Facebook users RSVP via reDiscover Center’s event page or email TCC.

Jeremy Irons in TRASHED

 

Culver City Council [finally] Addresses Plastic Bag Ban, Mon, Dec.10, 2012 7pm – BE THERE!!

 

Plastic Bag Public Hearing

 

Come one, come all—Let your voice be heard with our local governance!
The Culver City Council will be hearing public comments and deciding a policy direction for Culver City’s plastic bag policy. After LA County and LA City, Culver City is the last jurisdiction on Ballona Creek without a plastic bag ban.  We need to turn out all interested Culver City residents for maximum impact:

CULVER CITY PLASTIC BAG PUBLIC HEARING
When:

Monday, December 10th, 2012 7pm

Where:
Culver City Council Chambers
9770 Culver Blvd., Culver City, 90232

Contact:
Culver City residents only, please email your support to the
Culver City Mayor and Councilmembers in advance:

https://www.culvercity.org/Information/emailus.aspx?dept_id=38

Help us protect Santa Monica Bay and the oceans beyond by stopping pollution before it starts. Come deliver your 3 minutes in person to the council, or write an email to the council to be read aloud next Monday night in the chambers.

When you come to City Hall chambers, fill out a speaker’s card—ask for assistance if its your first time.

Here are some helpful talking points:

From Heal the Bay >>
http://www.healthebay.org/get-involved/take-action/california-plastic-bag-ban

From Surfrider >>
http://www.surfrider.org/programs/entry/rise-above-plastics

A blog link to pass along >>
http://lagreenmachine.org/2012/12/03/culver-city-council-to-finally-address-plastic-bag-ban-be-there-banthebag/

Culver City Hall decorated with Plastic Bags TCC’s Plastic Bag Think Tank Video >>
http://vimeo.com/15822782

Council member Meghan Sahli-Wells’ Plastic Bag Report on 350.org >>
http://www.350.org/en/node/26349

A recent article in the Culver City News by Gary Walker >>
http://www.culvercitynews.org/latest-news/council-to-hear-discussion-on-plastic-bags-dec-10/

For inspiration: THE MAJESTIC PLASTIC BAG (a mockumentary) >>
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLgh9h2ePYw

Where do many of those bags end up? Swirling around in one of the FIVE GYRES! >>
http://http://5gyres.org/what_is_the_problem/

Get Ready for MISINFORMATION TACTICS from the Plastic Bag Industry >>
http://5gyres.org/posts/2012/01/03/a_convenient_misconception_industry_tactics_for_misinformation 

In Defense of Plastic Bag Bans (on GreenBiz blog) >>
http://www.greenbiz.com/blog/2011/12/28/defense-plastic-bag-bans 

“PLASTIC BAG WARS” article in Rolling Stone >>
http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/news/the-plastic-bag-wars-20110725

And your official TCC FACEBOOK invite >>
https://www.facebook.com/events/503903089643478/